Units in Biochemistry


Biochemistry 210 (920.210)

12 points
Full Year

This unit is an introduction to the chemistry of living cells and organisms. Biologically important molecules are discussed with an emphasis on their structures and functions. A major part of the unit deals with the structure and chemistry of proteins which are the building material of the cell; chemical reactions that occur in cells and the principles underlying them; enzymes-proteins with catalytic activity and how they function in controlling reactions; and the storage, transmission and expression of genetic information. The latter stages of the unit tackle the regulation of metabolism and cellular function by hormones and other small molecules and evaluate the principles of metabolism and its regulation. The acquired knowledge is used to discuss such processes as exercise in humans and photosynthesis.

Lectures:

2 per week
Labs:

3 hrs per week, as arranged
Unit Co-ordinator:

Dr M. A. Bogoyevitch
Prerequisites:

a first-year unit in the biological sciences and a first-year chemistry unit. (Students intending to proceed to a third-year biochemistry unit are required to complete TEE Applicable Mathematics or Mathematics 122 and Statistics and Modelling 155. It is strongly recommended that students complete Molecular Biology 225 and a second-year chemistry unit).

(MB) Molecular Biology 325 (139.325)

12 points
Semester 2

For unit description and prerequisites see entry under 'Faculty and Other Units' after the Department of Zoology listing.


(BC) Molecular and Structural Biochemistry 351 (920.351)

12 points
Semester 1

This unit represents one half of a Biochemistry major: the molecular and structural component. It builds on what is taught in the second year in Biochemistry 210 and addresses cellular function from the perspective of the cellular macromolecules--DNA, RNA and protein. The relationship between structure and function is emphasised throughout the unit. Accordingly, how transcription and differential gene expression is accomplished in terms of the structure of DNA and RNA is addressed. How protein structure is studied, the established structural features of simple and complex proteins and how this relates to protein and enzyme function form a major component of this unit. The aim of this unit is not to be comprehensive in its coverage, but to select areas in these fields that are currently making an impact on biomedical science. Recent advances are highlighted and publications are discussed in the tutorials. Accordingly, this unit provides the biochemical basis for advanced units in molecular biology and cell biology. It does not duplicate, but complements, the content of Molecular Biology 325 and Mammalian Cell Biology 300.

Laboratory work comprises experiments designed to teach the major biochemical techniques--protein and nucleic acid separation, electrophoresis, ELISA, polymerase, chain reaction, enzyme and metabolite assays, use of radio-isotopes, extraction and assay of DNA and mRNA for the measurement of gene expression. The design, logistics and analysis of experiments are also emphasised.

Lectures:

3 per week
Tutorials:

1 per week
Labs:

9 hrs per week
Unit Co-ordinators:

Associate Professor G. C. T. Yeoh and Dr R. C. Tuckey
Prerequisites:

Biochemistry 210; TEE Applicable Mathematics or Mathematics 122 and Statistics and Modelling 155. It is strongly recommended that students complete Molecular Biology 225 and a second-year chemistry unit.

(BC) Cellular and Metabolic Biochemistry 352 (920.352)

12 points
Semester 2

This unit represents one half of a Biochemistry major: the cellular and metabolic component. It builds on what is taught in second year in Biochemistry 210 and covers the topics of protein targeting, signal transduction and the life cycle of cells--growth, differentiation, cancer and cell death. Mechanism of metabolic regulation, the role of enzymes and energy generation (which explains how cells cope with environmental changes and stress) complete this unit. The aim of this unit is not to be comprehensive in its coverage, but to select areas in these fields that are currently making an impact on biomedical science. Recent advances are highlighted and publications are discussed in the tutorials. Accordingly, this unit provides the biochemical basis for advanced units in molecular biology and cell biology. It does not duplicate, but complements the content of Molecular Biology 325 and Mammalian Cell Biology 300.

Laboratory work involves a research project. Students undertake a project working with a research group so that they experience many aspects of research work including planning, experimental design, library searches, report writing, etc. The project topics reflect the research interests of staff members and include a broad range of techniques for investigating the gene expression and metabolism of plants and animals in health and disease at the molecular level. A full range of projects which utilises, and in some cases extends, the range of laboratory techniques taught in Molecular and Structural Biochemistry 351 are offered. For students who have not completed Molecular and Structural Biochemistry 351, projects with techniques which relate to their other major units are offered where possible.

Lectures:

3 per week
Tutorials:

1 per week
Labs:

9 hrs per week
Unit Co-ordinators:

Associate Professor G. C. T. Yeoh and Dr R. C. Tuckey
Prerequisites:

Biochemistry 210; TEE Applicable Mathematics or Mathematics 122 and Statistics and Modelling 155 and one of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry 351, Molecular Biology 325, Molecular Genetics and Genomics 330 or Mammalian Cell Biology 300. It is strongly recommended that students complete Molecular Biology 225 and a second-year chemistry unit.