Units in the Department of Chemistry


Chemistry 100 (510.100)

12 points
Full Year

This unit is primarily for Science students who intend to major in Chemistry or to proceed with second-year major Chemistry units.

First Semester: The first few weeks of the semester are spent revising and extending some of the basic concepts in Chemistry (acids and bases, equilibrium, atomic structure, bonding, stereochemistry, nomenclature). The remainder of the semester is devoted to Organic Chemistry, where the properties, preparation, reactions and the uses of the various classes of organic compounds are discussed.

Second Semester: During second semester the integrated laboratory/lecture programme is concerned with Physical and Inorganic Chemistry. Content includes atomic structure and periodic trends of properties; models of bonding; solubility and acid-base equilibria in aqueous solution; electrochemistry; changes of enthalpy, entropy and free energy during reactions; phase equilibria in one- and two-component systems; properties of solutions; structures of molecules and crystals; chemistry of main block and first row transition elements; co-ordination chemistry; qualitative analysis of cations.

Laboratory work comprises exercises indicating the application of physical principles and their use in quantitative and qualitative analysis, together with some preparative organic chemistry. Unsatisfactory attendance and/or performance at the laboratory sessions will lead to zero laboratory marks. (Charges: A small charge is made for any item of laboratory equipment that a student breaks during the laboratory course.)

Lectures:

3 per week
Labs:

3 hrs per week
Tutorials:

1 per week
Unit Co-ordinator:

Associate Professor D. Wege
Prerequisite:

satisfactory performance (scaled score of 50 per cent or more) in TEE Chemistry (or equivalent). Students with a raw score of less than 40 per cent must consult a first-year Chemistry adviser.

Notes

Laboratory Notes for Chemistry 100 2

A4 size, bound laboratory notebook with ruled leaves (Victory Notebook, available from the University Co-operative Bookshop)

1Partial requirement for membership of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute is a substantial first-year study of all three branches of Chemistry. Chemistry 100 or 120 provides such a study.

2Purchase from the office in the southern foyer of the Department of Chemistry at the times indicated there. Office first opens on the Wednesday before semester 1 commences.


Chemistry 120 (510.120)

12 points
Full Year

This unit is of the same standard as Chemistry 100 and is recommended principally for students who intend to major in the biological sciences. However, it also provides entry to second- and third-year chemistry units.

First Semester: The first few weeks of the semester are spent revising and extending some of the basic concepts in Chemistry (acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, atomic structure, bonding, stereochemistry, nomenclature). The remainder of the semester is devoted to Organic Chemistry, where the properties, preparation, reactions and the uses of the various classes of organic compounds are discussed. A substantial emphasis is placed on biological molecules including proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids.

Second Semester: The Physical Chemistry and Inorganic Chemistry content of the unit deals with principles of chemistry and their applications: atomic and molecular structures; states of matter and phase transitions; structure, properties and reactions of classes of substances; properties of solutions; colloids; oxidation-reduction reactions; electrochemistry; equilibrium; acids, bases and buffers; thermodynamics including enthalpy, entropy and free energy changes of reactions; intermolecular forces; kinetics and catalysis. Inorganic chemistry includes chemistry of the elements, metal co-ordination compounds and oxidation states. Bioinorganic topics include electron transfer, ferredoxins, photosynthesis, chlorophyll, metalloporphyrins, haemoglobin and respiration.

Laboratory work comprises exercises illustrating basic techniques in physical, organic and inorganic chemistry. Unsatisfactory attendance and/or performance at the laboratory sessions will lead to zero laboratory marks. (Charges: A small charge is made for any item of laboratory equipment that a student breaks during the laboratory course.)

Lectures:

3 per week
Labs:

3 hrs per week
Tutorials:

1 per week, beginning in semester 2
Unit Co-ordinator:

Dr D. M. G. Tilbrook
Prerequisite:

satisfactory performance (scaled score of 50 per cent or more) in TEE Chemistry or equivalent. Students with a raw score of less than 40 per cent must consult a first-year Chemistry adviser.

Notes

Laboratory Notes for Chemistry 120

A4 size, bound laboratory notebook with ruled leaves (Victory Notebook, available from the University Co-operative Bookshop)

1Purchase from the office in the southern foyer of the Department of Chemistry at the times indicated there. Office first opens on the Wednesday before semester 1 commences.


Chemistry 200 (510.200)

24 points
Full Year

This unit can lead to any third-year chemistry unit (Chemistry 300, 310, 330, 360, 390, Environmental Chemistry 320 or Materials Chemistry 305) and comprises further studies in physical, organic and inorganic chemistry. The unit is prefaced by a series of 39 lectures in modern analytical and spectroscopic techniques which includes sections on atomic and molecular spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, X-ray spectroscopy and electroanalytical techniques.

The Physical Chemistry section (39 lectures) includes coverage of thermodynamics, equilibrium electrochemistry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, and the rates and mechanisms of reactions. Thermodynamics is developed through the three laws to demonstrate its applicability in science as applied to solutions, phase changes and electrochemical cells. Equilibrium electrochemistry deals with ions and electrodes, the activities of ions in solution, Debye-Huckel theory and the derivation of thermodynamic data from the cell emf. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy is introduced with a discussion of atomic energy levels and molecular energy levels for rotation and vibration. Chemical kinetics is presented as the determination of reaction order and rate constant and the study of reaction mechanisms via elementary reactions, consecutive reactions, chain reactions, polymerisation and catalysis. Molecular reaction dynamics, collision theory and diffusion controlled reactions are also briefly studied.

The Inorganic Chemistry section (39 lectures) includes the descriptive chemistry of the non-metallic elements at depth, following on from the first-year treatment and highlights certain areas such as the hydrides of boron and trends in catenation and multiple bonding. It also covers the structural basis of inorganic solids, particularly halides, oxides and sulphides, with emphasis on lattice packing and ionic interactions. The descriptive chemistry of the first transition series metals is included with illustration by the discussion of trends in oxidation states, stereochemistries and complex ion stability constants, and their role in certain biological systems is outlined. Simple concepts of valence are introduced as required to aid in the rationalisation of the above areas.

The Organic Chemistry section (39 lectures) contains an extension of the first-year treatment of arenes, electrophilic substitution and aromatic-based drugs and dyestuffs. The preparation and synthetic application of polyfunctional compounds are described together with the application of the concepts of stereochemistry and mechanism. The chemistry of the carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides and proteins, nucleosides, nucleotides and nucleic acids, and the mutual relationship among carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleic acids and proteins, are discussed.

Lectures:

6 per week
Labs:

6 hrs per week
Prerequisites:

Chemistry 100 or 120; Mathematics 101 and 102; or Mathematics 175 and 176; or Mathematics 155 and Statistics and Modelling 155. Physics 100 or 140 is highly recommended. Entry for those students without these units requires special approval.
Laboratory pre-enrolment:

Students should attend at some time during the week preceding the beginning of semester 1 in order to purchase laboratory notes 1 and to check and sign out equipment. Charges: The price of laboratory notes ranges from $1.50 to $10.

1Purchase from the office in the southern foyer of the Department of Chemistry at the times indicated there. Office first opens on the Wednesday before semester 1 commences.


Chemistry 260 (510.260)

16 points
Full Year

This unit is suitable, for example, for students in biological sciences who wish subsequently to enrol in third-year Chemistry. The unit comprises the sections on modern analytical and spectroscopic techniques (MAST) and physical chemistry and organic chemistry from Chemistry 200. Progression to Chemistry 300, 330, 360 or 390 is permitted but only general, organic and physical chemistry lecture topics can then be selected for the third-year course. Progression to Materials Chemistry 305 is also permitted.

Lectures:

58 in semester 1, 59 in semester 2
Labs:

6 hrs per week for the last 7 weeks of semester 1, the first 7 weeks of semester 2 and the last 6 weeks of semester 2
Prerequisites:

Chemistry 100 or 120; Mathematics 101 and 102; or Mathematics 175 and 176; or Mathematics 155 and Statistics and Modelling 155. Physics 100 or 140 is highly recommended. Entry without these units requires special approval.
Laboratory pre-enrolment:

Students must attend at some time during the week preceding the beginning of semester 1 in order to purchase laboratory notes 1 and to check and sign out equipment. Charges: The price of laboratory notes ranges from $1.50 to $10.

1Purchase from the office in the southern foyer of the Department of Chemistry at the times indicated there. Office first opens on the Wednesday before semester 1 commences.


(C) Biophysical Chemistry 306 (510.306)

24 points
Full Year

This unit is designed as a major in the Bachelor of Science (Biophysical Science) degree. It is also available as a unit in the Bachelor of Science degree. The unit covers the biophysical applications of chemistry to the life sciences. The unit comprises eight topics. The topic in Occupational Health and Safety is compulsory and the other seven can be chosen from the following list of electives. The lecture course is accompanied by laboratory work. There is a description of the available laboratory courses and a complete description for each topic under the unit Chemistry 300.

Topics

Compulsory Topic

HS. Occupational Health and Safety

Elective Topics

AC. Analytical Chemistry

BC. Biological Chemistry

BI. Bio-inorganic Chemistry

BM. Biomolecular Spectroscopy (topic NS is a prerequisite)

MC. Mechanistic Organic Chemistry

NP. Natural Products

NS. Spectroscopic Methods for Structure Determination (the same as NMR Spectroscopy)

PL. Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences

SD. Structural Determination of Biological Macromolecules

RP. Research Project

Unit Co-ordinator:

Dr A. McKinley
Prerequisite:

Chemistry 200 or Chemistry 260
Laboratory pre-enrolment:

Students must see the supervisors of the third-year chemistry laboratories on any morning between 9 and 10 a.m. during the week prior to the beginning of semester 1 to enable scheduling of laboratory classes in order to check lockers and to choose laboratory modules they wish to take.

Chemistry 310 (510.310)

24 points
Full Year

This unit is only for students who intend to take a double major in Chemistry. It is to be taken in conjunction with Chemistry 300 and comprises seven topics selected from those which are not being taken for Chemistry 300.

Lectures:

average of 3-4 per week
Labs:

3 x 3-hr sessions per week for 26 weeks
Prerequisites:

as for Chemistry 300
Laboratory pre-enrolment:

All students must see the supervisors of all the third-year chemistry laboratories on any morning between 9 and 10 a.m. during the week prior to the beginning of semester 1 to enable scheduling of laboratory classes and to check lockers.

Chemistry 330 (510.330)

6 points (2 topics)
Full Year

This unit is available for students wishing to undertake further studies in chemistry in conjunction with a major in Chemistry or a major in another department. The composition of this unit should be decided in consultation with a departmental adviser and will depend on the interests of the student and previous studies in chemistry at the second-year level. The topics are chosen from those available in Chemistry 300 and the laboratory component is a subset of that listed for Chemistry 300.

Prerequisites:

Chemistry 200, 246, 256, 260, 270 or 280, but note that only Chemistry 200 provides access to all possible choices of lecture topics in third-year Chemistry units

Chemistry 360 (510.360)

12 points (4 topics)
Full Year

This unit is available for students wishing to undertake further studies in chemistry in conjunction with a major in Chemistry or a major in another department. The composition of this unit should be decided in consultation with a departmental adviser and will depend on the interests of the student and previous studies in chemistry at the second-year level. The topics are chosen from those available in Chemistry 300 and the laboratory component is a subset of that listed for Chemistry 300.

Prerequisites:

Chemistry 200, 246, 256, 260, 270 or 280, but note that only Chemistry 200 provides access to all possible choices of lecture topics in third-year Chemistry units

Chemistry 390 (510.390)

18 points (6 topics)
Full Year

This unit is available for students wishing to undertake further studies in chemistry in conjunction with a major in Chemistry or a major in another department. The composition of this unit should be decided in consultation with a departmental adviser and will depend on the interests of the student and previous studies in chemistry at the second-year level. The topics are chosen from those available in Chemistry 300 and the laboratory component is a subset of that listed for Chemistry 300.

Prerequisites:

Chemistry 200, 246, 256, 260, 270 or 280, but note that only Chemistry 200 provides access to all possible choices of lecture topics in third-year Chemistry units