Units in the Department of Physiology


(PH) Physiology 200 (980.200)

16 points
Full Year

By enrolling in this unit, students are electing to combine their marks (subject to achieving a minimum mark of 45 per cent in each of the components) from the separate semester units Physiology 240 and Physiology 250 into a single final mark.

Students should consult a Department of Physiology course adviser to discuss the advantages of an enrolment in Physiology 200. See also Science Courses Booklet 2001 for further details.


(PH) Physiology 240 (980.240)

8 points
Semester 1

CELL PHYSIOLOGY

This unit is an introduction to the properties of single cells of vertebrates. It begins with a consideration of cells in general and the special properties of cell membranes for the transport of substances and the transduction of electrical and chemical signals. Students learn how the many functions of cells are regulated by signals passed from one cell to another to control cell growth, division and movement. They also learn how messages control gene expression, cell proliferation and organ development. Consideration is given to the principles governing the shaping of cell masses into organ systems and ultimately, into whole organisms.

Lectures:

3 per week
Labs/tutorials:

four 3-week cycle of two 3-hr labs and a 2-hr post-lab tutorial
Unit Co-ordinator:

Dr R. B. Patuzzi
Prerequisites:

There are no formal prerequisites for studying second-year physiology units. However, a knowledge of basic concepts of chemistry, mathematics and physics is assumed. Students without TEE Chemistry or Applicable Mathematics should consider taking Chemistry 130 and appropriate mathematics units in their first year and should read Appendix A to C of Human Physiology by L. Sherwood before beginning second-year Physiology. Students wishing to major in Physiology should have a minimum of TEE Chemistry or have done Chemistry 130. Further first-year University chemistry units (usually Chemistry 120) are strongly recommended for students with TEE Chemistry. It is also suggested that students with TEE Physics take Physics 140 in their first year. Students without TEE Physics should consider taking the remedial six-point unit Physics 131.

(PH) Physiology 250 (980.250)

8 points
Semester 2

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

This unit continues with the study of the way living organisms work--with humans as the central example. The functioning of all the major organ systems is covered including the nervous, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, reproductive and heart and circulatory systems, as well as the nervous and hormone regulation of their functions. Consideration is also given to the integration of the functioning of organ systems. Students are given the opportunity to develop their oral communication skills through short tutorial presentations on selected topics.

Those students without Physiology 240 should read chapters 2 to 4 of Human Physiology by L. Sherwood before beginning the unit.

Lectures:

3 per week
Labs/tutorials:

four 3-week cycle of two 3-hr labs and a 2-hr post-lab tutorial
Unit Co-ordinator:

Associate Professor H. W. Mitchell
Prerequisites:

as for Physiology 240. It is recommended (but not essential) that students have completed Physiology 240 before commencing Physiology 250.

(PH) Advanced Cellular Physiology 340 (980.340)

12 points
Semester 1

This is an advanced unit in cell physiology including membrane transport processes, neurophysiology and muscle physiology. Students majoring in Cell Physiology must take this unit. Lectures and laboratories are arranged in modules, each comprising supervised experiments with reading lists and a written assignment. Major emphasis in laboratory classes is given to hands-on investigative approaches to the solving of scientific problems using isolated cells, tissues and whole animal preparations. Assessment is by laboratory reports, assignments and a final examination.

This unit is distinctive from other physiology units as it gives students training in laboratory techniques for obtaining animal material for experimental purposes. It also utilises spreadsheets in data analysis, presentation and simulation of complex biological systems.

Lectures:

2-3 per week
Labs:

9 hrs per week
Unit Co-ordinator:

Dr A. J. Bakker
Prerequisite:

Physiology 240. Students majoring in Physiology must have completed TEE Chemistry or Chemistry 130.

(PH) Physiological Control Mechanisms 350 (980.350)

12 points
Semester 2

This unit contains a strong component of laboratory experiments in which students learn how physiological mechanisms provide integrated control in man and other mammals. A major objective is to develop an understanding of the links between cell physiology and the functioning of major organ systems, focusing particularly on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, metabolism and temperature control. The homeostatic mechanisms of control to meet the varying needs of the body are considered from a viewpoint of exercise and from the effects of system failure in disease. Assessment is by laboratory reports, assignments and a final examination.

This unit develops further students' laboratory techniques for physiological measurement in experimental animals and humans. Students also use simulation software to investigate the behaviour of complex systems.

Lectures:

2-3 per week
Labs:

9 hrs per week
Unit Co-ordinator:

Dr S. Maloney
Prerequisite:

Physiology 250. Students majoring in Physiology must have completed TEE Chemistry or Chemistry 130.